Archive for the ‘Microbiology’ Category

Many winners… and many thanks to all participants!

Tuesday 16 October, 2007

I am really impressed with the number of correct answers to the group A and B competitions, not that it was hard to find the correct answers, but because you took time to search, find, and send the answers rapidly in the middle of all the study load you have in college.

This time I overlooked تغاضيت عن spelling mistakes in writing the organism names; but next time, please follow the rules in writing any binomial name. Also, any answer should be supported by the references used.

Below is a list of all who sent the correct answers from both groups. Initially, only the first three winners per group were supposed to get the awards, but because many of you reported the answers on the same day, small prizes will be given to the first seven in each group. Thanks to all participants. Wait for competitions to come!

Group A:

1. Hossam Khaled Mohammed (answered at 12:35 PM on 9 Oct 2007, only 90 minutes after the lecture!)

2. Hossam Allam (9 Oct, 5:07 PM)

3. Abdel Rahman Medhat Mahmoud (9 Oct, 6:04 PM)

4. Rania Abou Zeid (9 Oct, 8:41 PM)

5. Radwa Raed (9 Oct, 10 PM)

6. Soha Gamal (9 Oct, 10:18 PM)

7. Ahmed Said (10 Oct, 1:18 AM)

8. Reem Belal Saber (10 Oct, 12:00 PM)

9. Gehad Essam Mohammed (11 Oct, 2:05 PM)

10. AbdulRahman Ibrahim (12 Oct, 7:03 PM)

11. Bishoy Saad (15 Oct, 1:43 AM)

12. Eman Adel (15 Oct, 8:43 PM- answered both questions!)

and…

  • Ola Amr (12 Oct, 1:43 AM): provided answer but source is missing
  • Aya ElSayed Mounib (9 Oct, 10:55 PM): provided sources but no answer yet

Group B:

1. Noha El Shami (10 Oct, 2:11 PM)

2. Mariam Reyad (10 Oct, 4:14 PM- Very well written answer!)

3. Yasmin Mostafa (10 Oct, 6:18 PM)

4. Motaz Taher (10 Oct, 7:53 PM)

5. Marco Azmy (10 Oct, 10:19 PM)

6. Marwa Mohamed Hamam (10 Oct, 11:26 PM)

7. Christina George (10 Oct, 11:34 PM)

8. Mohammed Saber (11 Oct, 12:38 AM)

9. Mariam Medhat Aziz (11 Oct, 1:30 AM)

10. Linah Hatem (11 Oct, 11:40 AM)

11. Somayya Hussein Hassan #1423 (11 Oct, 2:05 PM)

12. Nehal Abaza (11 Oct, 8:27 PM)

13. Nada Taha (12 Oct, 3:22 AM)

Competition! QuestionI/GroupB: The Dead Sea halophiles

Wednesday 10 October, 2007

Here is a question to group B third-year students, since students from group A have already answered yesterday’s question:

Find the name of a halophilic microorganism (a bacterium or preferably an archaeon) that has been isolated from the Dead Sea (البحر الميّت)…

Send the answer (name + source of information) by email or bring it in person. The fastest three will have prizes (of course, if the answer is correct!)

Competition! QuestionI/GroupA: What’s the microbe that withstands high radiation dose?

Tuesday 9 October, 2007

Find the name of a bacterium that can live in high radiation and is currently studied to be used for radioactive waste cleaning.

Send the answer (name + source of information) by email or bring it in person. The fastest three will have prizes (only if the answer is correct!)

Get ready for next lecture: microbial nutrition and growth conditions

Monday 8 October, 2007

موضوع محاضَرَتَيْ هذا الأسبوع بسيط لا تعقيد فيه، يتعلق بمعلومات أساسية عن التغذية وأثر الظروف الخارجية على نمو الكائنات الدقيقة. أتمنى أن تحضروا هذه المحاضرة كي تكتشفوا الكثير عن الميكروبات وطرق معيشتها المتنوعة جداً. تابعوها كأنّكم تشاهدون برنامجاً عن البكتيريا وليس كأنّكم تتلقون محاضرة تمتحنون فيها.

This week’s lectures (Tue 9 October, Wed 10 October) are about microbial nutrition and growth conditions. This topic is straightforward but really interesting. I hope you can attend and follow the lecture as if you’re watching a documentary about microbes rather than a part of the curriculum.

If you have half an hour to get prepared, I suggest the following:

  1. Read the main points in Part I, Chapters 4 and 5 in your book. Use speed reading and don’t get scared by the tables in these chapters. Most tables are just for additional knowledge, but the amount to be memorized is really minimal.
  2. Read about bacterial nutrition and growth in Todar’s Online Textbook of Bacteriology; it is the main reference for these chapters in your book. You can always look in the USC School of Medicine site: Bacteriology, Chapter Three (and like last time, you may even download the whole lecture from this page, or see the presentation and listen to the lecture here!).
  3. If you really have time and want to enjoy some deep reading, go to the library and read Chapters 4 and 5 in Brock’s Biology of Microorganisms. Dr. Thomas Brock has discovered plenty of thermophilic bacteria and you can expect his textbook to carry his legacy.

Week 2-3 lectures (Part I- Chapters 2-3) now online

Saturday 6 October, 2007

Dr. Aymen Yassin has released the online version of his lectures as online PowerPoint presentations. You can browse these lectures and review all the slides that were presented in the lecture room. Obviously, the purpose of putting these slides online is to provide you with the color figures and to let you take notes if you have missed a slide or two. However, they are not handouts or summaries and are NOT lecture notes (Don’t print them as your study tool!) Always resort to the book, or–better–to your own notes taken during the lecture and matched with info in the book.

How to access the lectures?

Well, the lectures will permanently be a part of the online course that will be coming out very soon next week on courses.egybio.net. There is one trick: you will need a password! Temporarily, you may access them following the links below. You will be asked to enter a username and password (these may be changed every week or two).

The username is:
thirddomain
The password is the answer to the following question (one word- small letters):
What is the third domain of life discovered by Carl Woese? (pay attention to the spelling)

Chapter2: Classification and Identification of Microbes

Chapter 3: Structure of the Prokaryotic Cell.

If you have any problems with reading the text, or if some characters are scrambled, make sure you set your broswer’s encoding to Unicode (UTF-8) (how?)

Good luck!

When bacteria were called viruses!

Saturday 29 September, 2007

The word “virus” was used in the past to refer to any poison (Latin: virus = poison), such as snake venom, and was later used to describe the causative agent of any infectious disease.

Pasteur often referred to pathogenic bacteria as viruses, but by the end of the nineteenth century, things have changed and infectious agents smaller than bacteria kept the name “filterable viruses” or viruses.

Source: Brock’s Biology of Microorganisms, Eighth Edition (P. 250)

Try to find more info and post it in the comments area…


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